MKID detectors turn out to have 100 times lower noise

Scientists use superconducting detectors (MKIDs) to discern the spectrum of exoplanets from their faint glow. Now, researchers from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and TU Delft have observed 100 times lower noise than expected, providing a new fundamental physics insight: the relationship between the number of quasiparticles and their lifetime vanishes. The study has been published in Physical Review B.Scientists use superconducting detectors (MKIDs) to discern the spectrum of exoplanets from their faint glow. Now, researchers from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and TU Delft have observed 100 times lower noise than expected, providing a new fundamental physics insight: the relationship between the number of quasiparticles and their lifetime vanishes. The study has been published in Physical Review B.Read More

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